IRVA

Daniel P. Sheehan, Ph.D

Daniel P. Sheehan, Ph.D

Daniel P. Sheehan is a Professor of Physics at the University of San Diego and has had a lifelong interest in the phenomenon of time.

He received his B.S. in chemistry from Santa Clara University in 1981 and his Ph.D. in physics from University of California, Irvine in 1987. His research interests include exotic plasmas, planetary formation, nanotechnology, and chemical physics. Over the last 25 years he has been investigating theoretical and experimental challenges to the second law of thermodynamics. He coauthored the first scientific monograph on the subject (2005) and also organized the first international conference devoted to it (2002). Over the last ten years he has become involved in the physics of time, particularly retrocausation, the proposition that the future can influence the past. He organized two AAAS symposia on this subject (2006 and 2011) and expects to host a third in June, 2016.

IRVA 2015 - Remote Viewing and Retrocausation

Abstract:

Daniel Sheehan & Patricia Cyrus will explore the phenomenon of retrocausation, the proposition that the future can influence the past. It will be approached both theoretically from the viewpoint of modern physics and experimentally through the lens of remote viewing.

Remote viewing is a protocol for observers to experience spatial and temporal displacements of consciousness. Perhaps the most enigmatic of these, from the perspective of traditional physics, are temporal displacements involving the future. This talk will explore the phenomenon of retrocausation, the proposition that the future can influence the past. It will be approached both theoretically from the viewpoint of modern physics and experimentally through the lens of remote viewing. Theory will be presented by Daniel Sheehan and experiments by Patricia Cyrus, an experienced remote viewer, who has recently completed a 10-year experimental study with collaborator, Dale Graff. The latter part of the presentation will be an attempt to reconcile and explain experimental results with mainstream physical theory.

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