IRVA

Roger Nelson

Roger Nelson

Dr. Roger Nelson is professionally trained as an experimental psychologist, but his background includes a broad range of experience in design and analysis and a background in physics, statistical methods, and multi-media production. He served as a counterintelligence officer in the US Army in Germany, then took a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology, focusing on the lesser known aspects of perception. He was a tenured professor at Johnson State College in Vermont until 1980 when he moved to Princeton University to take a position as research coordinator in the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) lab directed by Robert Jahn in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He retired from the University in 2002, but continues an intense engagement with consciousness research in his role as the director of The Global Consciousness Project which he founded in 1997.

IRVA 2009 - The World-Spanning View of Global Consciousness

Abstract:

The Global Consciousness Project (GCP) is an international scientific collaboration. We record continuous parallel data sequences from physical random sources located around the world. The resulting database is assessed for correlations with physical and social variables. We ask whether the random sequences contain periods of structure during pre-specified global events. According to standard physical theory, there should be no structure at all in these random data. Yet, we find that many of the events we examine are associated with inter-node correlations in the network. Special times like the celebrations of New Years, and tragic events like the attacks on September 11, 2001, show changes that apparently are linked to shared periods of deep engagement or widespread emotional reactions. We have conducted a series of over 275 formal tests of the basic hypothesis predicting statistical deviations in data collected during events that evoke mass consciousness. The results for ten years of continuous running indicate a small but highly significant correlation, with odds on the order of 10 million to one against chance.

IRVA 2009 - Panel Discussion:
Remote Viewing and the Nature of Consciousness

Abstract:

The nature of consciousness is a hot-button topic today. Psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers, and other professionals continue to engage in an ongoing debate as to what consciousness means. In reality, we may never know. Is it a product of the biological and classical physical interactions of the human brain; or is it something more fundamental, perhaps electromagnetic, or the result of quantum physics principles that we don't yet fully understand. Could it be something even more profound than that -- something beyond the scope of science and physics, any kind of physics, for us to understand?

Because consciousness seems to play a central role in remote viewing, and the underlying faculty that makes remote viewing work may be central to consciousness, this year's conference committee invites panel members with differing views and expertise to address this question: Just what is the connection between remote viewing and consciousness, and what does it tells us about human nature?

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